“Technology provides the tools and biology the problems”              – Stanley Fields

 

Episode 38: Sparking ideas-the creative minds building bioelectronics for biologists

 

Scientific advances depend not only on novel ideas and conceptual leaps, but also to a large extent on technological advances. Most scientists use some form of technology in their daily research, whether it be running a PCR in the lab, measuring oxygen concentration in a tank, or using remote sensing to track vast bird migrations.  

Technological developments in biology draw on a wide range of expertise in engineering, physics, chemistry, computer science, and management. An integral part of new technological discoveries is the partnership between scientists and those working in bioelectronics.

Here at the University of Glasgow, the bioelectronics team has worked with Institute researchers to develop everything from electronic mosquito sampling nets to automated lichen spore collectors.

spore_collector_device

Love is in the air. This low-cost Automated Spore Collector (ASC) is capable of sampling 0.28 m3 of air per min with a motor speed of 1800 rpm. Photo courtesy of Nosrat Mirzai.

spore_collector_forest

Science in Motion. The spinning motion pulls air in from both above and below the device, trapping any airborne spores from organisms such as lichens in a thin layer of petroleum jelly that coats the front most face of the sampling arms. Photo courtesy of Nosrat Mirzai

In this week’s episode, Naturally Speaking’s Laurie Baker (@llbaker1707) visits the basement of the Zoology building to talk with Nosrat Mirzai and Jakub Czyzweski about what the bioelectronics unit is doing to help the Institute keep pace in a changing scientific world.

 

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Intro and outro music sampled from: “The Curtain Rises” and “Early RiserKevin MacLeod [CC BY 3.0].

Posted by The Naturally Speaking Editors

A science pod-yssey and regular blog-yssey from the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine at the University of Glasgow

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