All posts by The Naturally Speaking Editors

A science pod-yssey and regular blog-yssey from the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine at the University of Glasgow

Episode 71 – All things being equal

Visiting speaker and workshop facilitator Dr Ana Payo Payo speaks about her research on migratory birds and her involvement in promoting equal opportunities for women and men in STEM

Episode 70 – International Women’s Day

For International Women’s Day this year, the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine celebrated with a special social event in the museum, where an extra special speech was given by one of our highly respected senior academics. In this episode, we capture the highlights of Prof Pat Monaghan‘s Women’s Day talk, wherein she speaks about her career in […]

Episode 69 – SalmoSim: The creation of an artificial salmon gut

The aquaculture industry is growing at a rapid rate, but our understanding of the factors that contribute to fish ‘performance’ – that is, how to ensure optimal health and growth – is not keeping pace. Rather than conduct costly field experiments, researchers at the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine are taking a different approach. Join us as […]

Episode 68 – Predictive Power: How sequence data and computers can help to find viral reservoirs

Imagine being able to predict the reservoir species for a newly-found virus just from its genetic code. Using cutting edge machine learning techniques, that is precisely what researchers from the University of Glasgow’s Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine and the Centre for Virus Research have managed to do. Join us in this episode of Naturally Speaking as […]

Shaky sheep, tapeworms and ‘ormilo’: Investigating a neurological syndrome of small ruminants in Tanzania

Maasai pastoralist livestock keepers in northern Tanzania have become increasingly concerned about a disease that is causing strange behaviour in their sheep and goats – a disease these animals are eventually dying from. Anecdotal evidence suggested that a dog tapeworm could be the cause, but more research was needed. Last year, PhD student Ellen Hughes travelled to Tanzania to investigate the epidemiology and causes of this important threat to pastoral livelihoods and food security.

Podcast Series: The RRS Discovery – Episode 2

Episode 2: What lies beneath? Join us again aboard the Royal Research Ship Discovery, cruising towards the mid-Atlantic to an area known as the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone. As we heard in the previous episode, this unique cruise brought together researchers from multiple disciplines to apply their specialist skills to collect data in the region. In this episode we hear from […]

The British Ecological Society conference: a PhD student’s experience

Birmingham: second most populous city in the UK, home to the infamous Peaky Blinders and host to the British Ecological Society annual meeting in December 2018. The BES is the biggest conference dedicated to ecology in Europe, with over 1200 delegates from 40 countries. Over the course of three days there were 4 plenary seminars, 200 posters, workshops, social mixers […]