Tag: ornithology

But what is best for the gulls? Food and resources in a changed environment

We all know that diet can have a big impact on our health, and the same is true for the wildlife around us. Some animals adapt to new food resources, often bringing them into our everyday, where we see them scavenging for morsels. Recent Institute graduate Dr Nina O’Hanlon talks about her research into gull diet and how it is affecting their colonies.

Growing quickly comes at a price

Most of us have heard about antioxidants in the news or at the supermarket. But what are they? And how are they related to damage causing particles called free radicals? In this post Dr Shona Smith discusses her research on these important molecules, and explores their relationship to animal growth.

Episode 53: IBAHCM’s April Highlights

Join us in another celebration of the Institute as we look back at the highlights from the month of April (2017). Listen as Laurie Baker, Taya Forde, Karen Hotopp and James Burgon discuss recent publications, awards and achievements by Institute researchers.

Episode 48: Sweden’s Avian Renaissance Man—Conversations with Professor Jan-Ake Nilsson

There are many ways to study life strategies of small passerines. Professor Jan-Ake Nilsson of the University of Lund sat down with us to talk about his studies, and the fantastic little birds that he has worked with.

Episode 47: Years Reflections (and Happy Holidays)

As the year draws to a close, Naturally Speaking’s Laurie Baker, Taya Forde, Karen Hotopp and James Burgon reflect upon the highlights of another great year communicating the work of the Institute.

Episode 36: What’s in it for the bird? Extra-pair mating and inbreeding in Song Sparrows

Bird researcher, Prof. Jane Reid, never set out to become an academic, in fact, she tried her very best not to. Having developed an interest in birds from a young age, her great ambition was to work for the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB). But, she figured to work there she would probably need a PhD. Yet, […]

Episode 31 – At the Helm of chronobiology

At the Helm of chronobiology Why do we wake up early on our days off? Or notice it is almost lunchtime after our stomachs emit a rumble of hunger? Like all living organisms we have clocks inside us—internal timing mechanisms that guide everything from fine scale molecular processes to seasonal migrations. The study of these biological clocks is called chronobiology, […]