Tag: Conservation

Wild dogs of the Serengeti

When conserving wildlife species, re-introductions are just the beginning of the process. The question is, how do you ensure the species long-term sustainability? This is a challenge faced by the Serengeti Painted Wolves, a collaboration between the Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute and our own Institute. In this post the project members describe their conservation work with African wild dogs—their recent successes […]

Taiwan’s task: balancing development and conservation

FEATURED: Our most visited post of 2015 – PhD student Yi-Hsiu Chen writes about how we measure and minimise damage to ecosystems from developments like reservoirs and wind farms.

Stress is cool

How do we know if an animal is stressed? This unpleasant state is not reserved for humans, and if possible we would like to minimise the stress experienced by the animals around us. Traditionally, we have relied on measuring hormones in the blood to know if an animal is in a stressful state, but this invasive procedure has a flaw […]

Episode 18 – On the Wings of a Giant, Interview with Richard Phillips (British Antarctic Survey)

This is the first in our series of Naturally Speaking Shorts where we interview visiting and IBAHCM researchers about their work and how they ended up in science. In this episode, we interview University of Glasgow alumnus, Dr. Richard Phillips (British Antarctic Survey), about his work with albatrosses in South Georgia and his advice for young ecologists entering the field. Tune […]

Special – The Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative (Naturally Speaking with theGIST)

This is the first in our series of joint podcasts with theGIST, a student science magazine, blog, podcast and YouTube channel run by students from the Universities of Glasgow and Strathclyde . In this episode, we interviewed Prof. Ted Leighton, the former director of the Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative, after he gave a talk to the Institute in February. Miss […]

Silent witnesses: investigating wildlife crime in Scotland

Welcome to the latest Naturally Speaking blog post. This post was written by Research Associate Caroline Millins a qualified veterinary pathologist and researcher in wildlife disease epidemiology. Here Caroline describes work that was featured in her most recent research paper, but also gives the broader story to becoming involved in wildlife pathology. Silent witnesses: investigating wildlife crime in Scotland Seeing wildlife in its natural habitat makes […]

Episode 14 – Linking science and policy

FEATURED: Our most visited post of 2014 – in this episode we chat to colleagues across the Institute about how they’ve successfully communicated science into policy.