In this episode James Buckley and Shaun Killen chat with Institute researchers Dominic McCafferty and Donald Reid.

Dominic tells us about how he’s used thermal imaging to see how baby rabbits – which are born completely without fur – are able to help keep themselves warm by huddling together. Donald then talks about how, for juvenile salmon, habitat complexity and unpredictable food sources can completely alter the relationship between how much food an animal needs and how it behaves in its environment.

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Atlantic salmon parr. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service—Northeast Region [CC BY 2.0], via Flickr.

Episode 3 – Focus on Research: Baby Bunnies and Juvenile Salmon

Posted by Shaun

One Comment

  1. […] stress remotely using thermal imaging, and long listening Naturally Speakers may remember our 2012 podcast with Dr Dominic McCafferty. However, our friends at theGIST thought this distinctly visual research […]

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