Forever Young—Learning to Stay Healthy to 100

PhD student Adam Field discusses biogerontology (‘ageing biology’) and what we can learn from animals that are seemingly better at ageing than us about living longer, healthier lives.

The work-life balance: thoughts from Institute Director Prof. Dan Haydon

Striking the ideal work-life balance is a challenge faced by many in academia. Here, Institute Director Professor Dan Haydon shares his thoughts on this thorny topic.

Episode 49: How smart are fish?

Fish may be more intelligent than you realise—from their ability to form complicated 3D mind maps, to learning to visually discriminate among over 40 human faces! Join Taya Forde as she speaks to 2016 Buckland Professor of Fisheries Felicity Huntingford, biologist Dr Martina Quaggiotto, and life-long fishers Charles Jardine Marshall Bissett to discuss how smart fish really are.

Episode 48: Sweden’s Avian Renaissance Man—Conversations with Professor Jan-Ake Nilsson

There are many ways to study life strategies of small passerines. Professor Jan-Ake Nilsson of the University of Lund sat down with us to talk about his studies, and the fantastic little birds that he has worked with.

Kampung life and mosquito vectors of disease in Malaysian Borneo

In villages across the Malaysian state of Sabah, locals are being asked to do something unusual: expose themselves to—potentially malaria carrying—mosquitoes. The person behind this request is third year PhD student Rebecca Brown. Here, Rebecca explains why and walks us through the steps of conducting her tropical field research.

Episode 47: Years Reflections (and Happy Holidays)

As the year draws to a close, Naturally Speaking’s Laurie Baker, Taya Forde, Karen Hotopp and James Burgon reflect upon the highlights of another great year communicating the work of the Institute.

Back to the Future @ SCENE

Dr Dominic McCafferty reflects his time living and working in remote field stations and their importance in ecology. He also discusses the running and history of the University’s own field station on the banks of Loch Lomond—the Scottish Centre for Ecology and the Natural Environment (SCENE).