Category: Focus on Research

Episode 68 – Predictive Power: How sequence data and computers can help to find viral reservoirs

Imagine being able to predict the reservoir species for a newly-found virus just from its genetic code. Using cutting edge machine learning techniques, that is precisely what researchers from the University of Glasgow’s Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine and the Centre for Virus Research have managed to do. Join us in this episode of Naturally Speaking as […]

Shaky sheep, tapeworms and ‘ormilo’: Investigating a neurological syndrome of small ruminants in Tanzania

Maasai pastoralist livestock keepers in northern Tanzania have become increasingly concerned about a disease that is causing strange behaviour in their sheep and goats – a disease these animals are eventually dying from. Anecdotal evidence suggested that a dog tapeworm could be the cause, but more research was needed. Last year, PhD student Ellen Hughes travelled to Tanzania to investigate the epidemiology and causes of this important threat to pastoral livelihoods and food security.

Episode 65: Making Connections – linking data on biodiversity

Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine researcher Prof Rod Page was recently awarded the Ebbe Nielsen prize for his proposal to help document the biodiversity of Australia by linking a variety of open sources of data. Tune in to hear about the challenges and opportunities associated with the exciting field of ‘biodiversity informatics’ – tapping into big data […]

Episode 58: Lumped together – explaining species co-existence

Episode 58: Lumped together – explaining species co-existence The competitive exclusion principle states that in the long term, the number of species should never exceed the number of available resources. Phytoplankton species paradoxically violate this rule. Instead, species with similar traits co-exist in “clumps” in which there is redundancy among species occupying the same niche, helping ensure the delivery of […]

Episode 57: Of mice and microbes

Episode 57: Of Mice and microbes Are parasites always harmful? How diverse are the microbial communities living within individual hosts? These are questions that Dr Sarah Knowles – a researcher at the Royal Veterinary College in London – has set out to address. She visited IBAHCM in January as a guest lecturer in the Institute’s weekly seminar series. In this […]

Episode 54: IBAHCM’s May and June Highlights

Listen in as James Burgon, Laurie Baker, Stephen Larcombe, Taya Forde and Karen Hotopp talk about the publications, staff advancements and other exciting news coming out of the Institute from May and June.

But what is best for the gulls? Food and resources in a changed environment

We all know that diet can have a big impact on our health, and the same is true for the wildlife around us. Some animals adapt to new food resources, often bringing them into our everyday, where we see them scavenging for morsels. Recent Institute graduate Dr Nina O’Hanlon talks about her research into gull diet and how it is affecting their colonies.